British Values

At Bleasdale School we promote ‘British Values’ through our spiritual, moral, social and cultural education which permeates through the schools’ curriculum and supports the development of the ‘whole child’.

We recognise that such development is most successful when those values and attitudes are promoted by all staff and provide a model of behaviour for our pupils.

As well as actively promoting British values, the opposite also applies: we will challenge pupils, staff or parents expressing opinions contrary to fundamental British values, including ‘extremist’ views.

The British values we identify with are not unique to Britain. We acknowledge that they differ in no way from the values of the countries and the cultural backgrounds represented by some of our families at Bleasdale School.

Below are just a few examples of how we promote British values. The examples have been broken down into our Pathways of Learning: To Be, To Do and To Know.

British values at Bleasdale School

June 2023 overview

Area

What it looks like in the ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Enable students to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence

Through our PSHE (and Social, Emotional and Mental Health themed) curriculum we not only provide standalone lessons but also thread this area through all lessons. 

Typical example of Self-knowledge: Recognising yourself on other media (TV screen, Ipad, photo)

Typical example of Self-esteem: regular and very closely related praise from an immediate task, use of object of reference

Typical example of Self-confidence:

Attendance to celebration assemblies – taking part in a process of understanding in front of their hub area/department what they have done well. This will be complemented by simple routines combined with themed music. 

Through our PSHE (and Social, Emotional and Mental Health themed) curriculum we not only provide standalone lessons but also thread this area through all lessons. 

Typical example of Self-knowledge: Recognising yourself on other media (TV screen, Ipad, photo)

Typical example of Self-esteem: regular and very closely related praise from an immediate tray-task 

Typical example of Self-confidence:

Attendance virtually (in person if possible) to celebration assemblies – taking part in a process of understanding in front of their hub area/department what they have done well. This will be completed with Now and Next schedules.

Through our PSHE (and Social, Emotional and Mental Health themed) curriculum we not only provide standalone lessons but also thread this area through all lessons. 

Typical example of Self-knowledge: Understanding who we are, attending EHCP annual review meetings, looking at family history.

Typical example of Self-esteem: regular praise, clearly linked rewards to progressing with IEP targets, regular daily class meetings to understand progression, morning task check in to raise self-esteem. 

Typical example of Self-confidence:

Attendance to celebration assemblies – taking part in a process of understanding in front of their hub area/department what they have done well weekly.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Enable students to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the civil and criminal law of England

Distinguish right from wrong:

Every day our pupils are given opportunity to understand right from wrong from choice of two, behaviour, rules within the classroom and school and to the wider curriculum of PSHE and cross curricula

In our sensory classes we often model stories and use objects of reference to support with appropriate routines to understand. To support students, we are able to explore social choices help the pupils understand how to communicate their need. This is one of the many methods we use to teach our pupils about acceptable behaviours in a variety of social situations. We also work on pupils understanding of self-identity so we teach this developmentally.

Respect the civil and criminal law of England:

PSHE Equals schemed of work;

1) 2.2b Rules

2) 2.5b Right and choices

3)3.4f Making compromises

Theses unit of work would be adapted to meet the needs of a sensory co-hort. Themed days, artifacts, practical activities and social stories are just some of the learning techniques that would be applied.

Distinguish right from wrong:

Every day our pupils are given opportunity to understand right from wrong from choice of two, behaviour, rules within the classroom and school and to the wider curriculum of PSHE and cross curricula

In our structured classes we often use social stories and schedules to support with appropriate routines to understand; restorative practice with individuals who are able to access this. To support students, we are able to explore social rules this way to help understanding. This is one of the many methods we use to teach our pupils about acceptable behaviours in a variety of social situations. We also work on pupils understanding of self-identity so we teach this developmentally.

Respect the civil and criminal law of England:

In our structured classes we use strategies such as:  social stories to explore and understand social rules;  schedules to support the expectation and understanding  of appropriate activities, routines and behaviours; and we use  restorative practice with individuals who are able to access this.

We also teach this developmentally by  work on pupils understanding of self-identity.

PSHE Equals schemed of work;

1) 2.2b Rules

2) 2.5b Right and choices

3)3.4f Making compromises, goodwill and conflict resolution

These units of work would be adapted to meet the individualized needed of the structured co-hort. Staff would support students with their understanding and social stories and themed days would r=be utilized.

As our students often struggle to empathise with others and so  understand the effect their actions, we use clear reward and consequence systems such as star charts. 

Distinguish right from wrong:

Every day our pupils are given opportunity to understand right from wrong from choice of two, behaviour, rules within the classroom and school and to the wider curriculum of PSHE and cross curricula

In our traditional classes the pupils often understand modelling and are often given further responsibility to be able to test, try and understand their moral compass with the right and wrong thing to do. 

Respect the civil and criminal law of England:

Within PSHE modules of work taken from Bleasdale’s curriculum we specifically look at (2.2b) Rules, (2.5b) Right and choices, (3.4f) Making compromises, good will and conflict resolution to name but a few. 

A while school event would include Bonfire night/Guy Fawkes as a working example from history. Each teacher adapts this during the festival for their own pupils to re-enforce learning in this area. 

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Encourage students to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative, and to understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality of the school and to society more widely

Individualised Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and use self-regulation of behaviour.  These have been broken into 3 levels. The first is a Pen picture – the most pertinent information you need to know about the pupil at a glance. Some of these have been made into a personal pupil passport. Every pupil in our school has one of these throughout their time at Bleasdale School. Level two is a short behaviour plan that begins to introduce the individualised need for the pupil within the six stages of a crisis (if the pupil displays these behaviours). Level 3 is a Level two behaviour plan, but also incorporates PBSS 4 areas of need. All behaviour plans are discussed with the individual, home, school and behaviour lead and reviewed regularly. All behaviour within the school is reported on our system Slueth and reviewed in regular Behaviour lead meetings where an action plan and improvement is recorded. 

Another example would be within our PSHE curriculum which includes charity work and covers environmental issues such as litter and recycling. This is adapted to the sensory cohort. 

Individualised Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and use self-regulation of behaviour.  These have been broken into 3 levels. The first is a Pen picture – the most pertinent information you need to know about the pupil at a glance. Some of these have been made into a personal pupil passport. Every pupil in our school has one of these throughout their time at Bleasdale School. Level two is a short behaviour plan that begins to introduce the individualised need for the pupil within the six stages of a crisis (if the pupil displays these behaviours). Level 3 is a Level two behaviour plan, but also incorporates PBSS 4 areas of need. All behaviour plans are discussed with the individual, home, school and behaviour lead and reviewed regularly. All behaviour within the school is reported on our system Slueth and reviewed in regular Behaviour lead meetings where an action plan and improvement is recorded. 

Another example would be within our PSHE curriculum which includes charity work and covers environmental issues such as litter and recycling. This is adapted to the structured cohort.

Individualised Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and use self-regulation of behaviour.  These have been broken into 3 levels. The first is a Pen picture – the most pertinent information you need to know about the pupil at a glance. Some of these have been made into a personal pupil passport. Every pupil in our school has one of these through out their time at Bleasdale School. Level two is a short behaviour plan that begins to introduce the individualised need for the pupil within the six stages of a crisis (if the pupil displays these behaviours). Level 3 is a Level two behaviour plan, but also incorporates PBSS 4 areas of need. All behaviour plans are discussed with the individual, home, school and behaviour lead and reviewed regularly. All behaviour within the school is reported on our system Slueth and reviewed in regular Behaviour lead meetings where an action plan and improvement is recorded. 

Another example would be within our PSHE curriculum which includes charity work and covers environmental issues such as litter and recycling.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Enable students to acquire a broad general knowledge of and respect for public institutions and services in England

Enable students to acquire a broad general knowledge of England:

Teachers are adept at referencing local and British culture at every opportunity during the offered curriculum. Some examples of this would be:

Geographically: Water and seaside holiday topics ensure that children have a better understanding of what Britain is, learning more about:

•its coasts, rivers and mountains is learnt through sensory choices and then fed back to the teacher  with understanding of like and dislikes by switches, eye pointing, pointing and sometimes on-body Makaton. 

•where Britain is in relation to the rest of Europe and other countries in the world in a co-active experience with 1:1 support

Historically: Key moments in British history are studied in the topics such as Vikings, the gunpowder plot and several other topics through a well designed VAK impacting lesson relating to tangible objects and of course the pupils EHCP and termly IEP.

English: We often studied a varied set of authors from the UK and other cultures and place a few key historical figures each year for example a Shakespeare Day and Roald Dahl Day. This learning is often offered within built up simple routines and age appropriate learning. Only one of these days may be built up to over a number of weeks. 

Food Tech/Art & DT: Throughout the learning in the Art and DT room you will often find a varied exploration of both UK and European artists by design of the curriculum. Also classic cultural heritage days occur in the calendar of work for example: Pancake day and a Valentines disco. These are always worked through with the pupil’s Engagement Steps/Quest/Physio/OT/SaLT targets at the forefront of the learning.

Respect for public institutions and services in England:

Gaining a stronger understanding of the NHS, fire service, police, armed forces,  libraries, museums, National Trust, Monarchy,  Government and 

Bank of England are often referred to though out the curriculum and within cross curricula links during lessons with our young people. We also take the opportunity to promote these during our ‘Summer’ Day. This is a day dedicated to leisure and celebration of our own hard work and what is on offer to us. We always invite the services so the pupils can learn and interact with them. 

Pupils also take the opportunity to when learning off site to regularly visit churches/places of worship, museums, art galleries, theatres and music venues e.g. The Philharmonic.

Enable students to acquire a broad general knowledge of England:

Teachers are adept at referencing local and British culture at every opportunity during the offered curriculum. Some examples of this would be:

Geographically: Water and seaside holiday topics ensure that children have a better understanding of what Britain is, learning more about:

•its coasts, rivers and mountains and understanding how we can tolerate these different sensory experiences.

•where Britain is in relation to the rest of Europe and other countries in the world. This is always related to tangible objects and relevance to them selves.

Historically: Key moments in British history are studied in the topics such as Vikings, the gunpowder plot and several other topics. These session would be built up over a number of weeks – exploring these large subjects sometimes for only 30 seconds and building up to 10 minutes. 

English: We often studied a varied set of authors from the UK and other cultures and place a few key historical figures each year for example a Shakespeare Day and Roald Dahl Day. Total communication is key to exploring these figures often with the four areas of SEND at the four front of there learning.

Food Tech/Art & DT: Throughout the learning in the Art and DT room you will often find a varied exploration of both UK and European artists by design of the curriculum. Also classic cultural heritage days occur in the calendar of work for example: Pancake day and a Valentines disco. These are always worked through with the pupil’s Engagement Steps/SCERTS/Physio/OT/SaLT targets at the forefront of the learning.

Respect for public institutions and services in England:

Gaining a stronger understanding of the NHS, fire service, police, armed forces,  libraries, museums, National Trust, Monarchy,  Government and 

Bank of England are often referred to though out the curriculum and within cross curricula links during lessons with our young people. We also take the opportunity to promote these during our ‘Summer’ Day. This is a day dedicated to leisure and celebration of our own hard work and what is on offer to us. We always invite the services so the pupils can learn how to tolerate them. An opportunity to desensitize. 

Pupils also take the opportunity to when learning off site to regularly visit churches/places of worship, museums, art galleries, theatres and music venues e.g. The Philharmonic.

Enable students to acquire a broad general knowledge of England:

Teachers are adept at referencing local and British culture at every opportunity during the offered curriculum. Some examples of this would be:

Geographically: Water and seaside holiday topics ensure that children have a better understanding of what Britain is, learning more about:

•its coasts, rivers and mountains

•where Britain is in relation to the rest of Europe and other countries in the world

Historically: Key moments in British history are studied in the topics such as Vikings, the gunpowder plot and several other topics

English: We often studied a varied set of authors from the UK and other cultures and place a few key historical figures each year for example a Shakespeare Day and Roald Dahl Day.

Food Tech/Art & DT: Throughout the learning in the Art and DT room you will often find a varied exploration of both UK and European artists by design of the curriculum. Also classic cultural heritage days occur in the calendar of work for example: Pancake day and a Valentines disco

Respect for public institutions and services in England:

Gaining a stronger understanding of the NHS, fire service, police, armed forces,  libraries, museums, National Trust, Monarchy,  Government and 

Bank of England are often referred to though out the curriculum and within cross curricula links during lessons with our young people. We also take the opportunity to promote these during our ‘Summer’ Day. This is a day dedicated to leisure and celebration of our own hard work and what is on offer to us. We always invite the services so the pupils can learn and interact with them. 

Pupils also take the opportunity to when learning off site to regularly visit churches/places of worship, museums, art galleries, theatres and music venues e.g. The Philharmonic.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Further tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions by enabling students to acquire an Appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term: where pupils will experience a sensory Bleasdale tradition of contribute to whole a school soup making. In house pantomimes in at Christmas: where pupils will have an opportunity to be supported with a sensory telling of the story while sitting amongst  larger groups of people while tolerating louder sounds, Easter events: larger group participation in sensory activities looking for learning within the 5/7 areas of cognition, Diwali – often exploring tracking objects and use of repetition and predictability, Guy Falk’s night, making simple choices when interacting with the afternoon of learning and Chinese new year: with use of sensory understanding of the day. We also value and celebrate national events: an example being the 100th anniversary of the start of World War One, with a remembrance day service each year, our poppy garden and silver birch to represent the fields visited by two of our pupils in the Somme.

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term: where pupils will follow board maker instructions to contribute to whole school soup making and in house pantomimes in at Christmas: where pupils will have an opportunity to tolerate larger groups of people and louder sounds, Easter events: larger group participation in structured activities using alternative means of communication, Diwali – often exploring tracking objects and use of repetition and predictability, Guy Falk’s night, making simple choices when interacting with the afternoon of learning and Chinese new year: with use of sensory understanding of the day. We also value and celebrate national events: an example being the 100th anniversary of the start of World War One, with a remembrance day service each year, our poppy garden and silver birch to represent the fields visited by two of our pupils in the Somme.

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term and in house pantomimes in at Christmas, Easter events, Diwali, Guy Falk’s night and Chinese new year. We also value and celebrate national events, an example being the 100th anniversary of the start of World War One, with a remembrance day service each year, our poppy garden and silver birch to represent the fields visited by two of our pupils in the Somme.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

Encourage respect for other people

Bleasdale and the surrounding area of Knowsley has a low incident of ethnic minority cultures and faiths. However, this only makes exploration of such of great importance as ignorance of others is no excuse. We promote and celebrate different backgrounds and beliefs. Tolerance, politeness and mutual respect are at the heart of our Statement of Intent and ethos. 

 The school Mission Statement to “Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement” fosters mutual respect and recognition of others. 

Some examples we have that serve to enhance pupils’ understanding and respect for different faiths and beliefs are:

Through Religious Education, PSHE and other lessons where we develop full body sensory exploration, awareness and appreciation of other cultures – in English through heavily supported sensory fiction and in art and music by considering cultures from other parts of the world.

Celebrating cultural differences through assemblies, themed weeks, noticeboards and displays  – by encouraging pupils to initiate interactions with others and in front of larger groups of people (based on SaLT targets).

Whilst instances contrary to our values are relatively rare, no school can guarantee that there will never be instances which are contrary to our values. Each is treated seriously in line with our policies and expectations.

Bleasdale and the surrounding area of Knowsley has a low incident of ethnic minority cultures and faiths. However, this only makes exploration of such of great importance as ignorance of others is no excuse. We promote and celebrate different backgrounds and beliefs. Tolerance, politeness and mutual respect are at the heart of our Statement of Intent and ethos. 

 The school Mission Statement to “Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement” fosters mutual respect and recognition of others. 

Some examples we have that serve to enhance pupils’ understanding and respect for different faiths and beliefs are:

Through Religious Education, PSHE and other lessons where we develop awareness and appreciation of other cultures with sensory exploration of objects/experiences– in English through inclusive sensory fiction and in art and music by considering cultures from other parts of the world.

Celebrating cultural differences through assemblies, themed weeks, noticeboards and displays – by encouraging pupils to initiate interactions with others and in front of larger groups of people (based on SaLT targets).

Whilst instances contrary to our values are relatively rare, no school can guarantee that there will never be instances which are contrary to our values. Each is treated seriously in line with our policies and expectations.

Bleasdale and the surrounding area of Knowsley has a low incident of ethnic minority cultures and faiths. However, this only makes exploration of such of great importance as ignorance of others is no excuse. We promote and celebrate different backgrounds and beliefs. Tolerance, politeness and mutual respect are at the heart of our Statement of Intent and ethos. 

 The school Mission Statement to “Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement” fosters mutual respect and recognition of others. 

Some examples we have that serve to enhance pupils’ understanding and respect for different faiths and beliefs are:

Through Religious Education, PSHE and other lessons where we develop awareness and appreciation of other cultures – in English through fiction and in art and music by considering cultures from other parts of the world.

Celebrating cultural differences through assemblies, themed weeks, noticeboards and displays.

Whilst instances contrary to our values are relatively rare, no school can guarantee that there will never be instances which are contrary to our values. Each is treated seriously in line with our policies and expectations.

 

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process

Children, parents and staff have many opportunities for their voices to be heard at Bleasdale. Democracy is central to how we operate and reflected in our equal opportunities policy.

The election of School Council members reflects the British electoral system. The Student Council meet regularly to bring suggestions to the table from their peers and make decisions about ways to improve the school for the benefit of all. Our sensory pupils are elected and partake in choosing agenda and voting on ideas given from choice boards/switches and objects of reference.

Staff encourage children to know that their views count, to value each other’s views, and to talk and listen to each other about their feelings. Pupils learn to respect the right of every individual to have their opinions and voices heard. We encourage pupils to take ownership of not only their school but also of their own learning and progress whenever possible. This encourages a heightened sense of both personal and social responsibility and is demonstrated on a daily basis by our pupils. This voice can be heard through objects of reference, photographs, symbols, eye pointing, body language and assistive technology such as eye gaze or switches.

Pupils are always listened to by adults and considerable time is taken to understand the meaning of our pupils ‘voice’.

Parents’ opinions are welcomed at Bleasdale through an annual parent/carer questionnaire, parents’ evenings, Annual Reviews, Parent Support Group and through the Parent/Carer Facebook page.

Not only does this democratic voice feed through the pupil’s curriculum, we have also made it overtly clear in Topic Summer 4 2022 with a “Pupil Led Topic” Term.

Children, parents and staff have many opportunities for their voices to be heard at Bleasdale. Democracy is central to how we operate and reflected in our equal opportunities policy.

The election of School Council members reflects the British electoral system. The Student Council meet regularly to bring suggestions to the table from their peers and make decisions about ways to improve the school for the benefit of all. Our sensory pupils are elected and partake in choosing agenda and voting on ideas given from choice boards/switches and key symbols or pictures.

Staff encourage children to know that their views count, to value each other’s views, and to talk and listen to each other about their feelings. Pupils learn to respect the right of every individual to have their opinions and voices heard. We encourage pupils to take ownership of not only their school but also of their own learning and progress whenever possible. This encourages a heightened sense of both personal and social responsibility and is demonstrated on a daily basis by our pupils. This voice can be heard through using photographs, symbols, eye pointing and body language.

Pupils are always listened to by adults and considerable time is taken to understand the meaning of our pupils ‘voice’.

Parents’ opinions are welcomed at Bleasdale through an annual parent/carer questionnaire, parents’ evenings, Annual Reviews, Parent Support Group and through the Parent/Carer Facebook page.

Not only does this democratic voice feed through the pupil’s curriculum, we have also made it overtly clear in Topic Summer 4 2022 with a “Pupil Led Topic” Term.

Children, parents and staff have many opportunities for their voices to be heard at Bleasdale. Democracy is central to how we operate and reflected in our equal opportunities policy.

A clear example is the School Council. Pupils are elected not only to express their own views on matters about the school but also to represent the needs of others who do not have a voice e.g. PMLD pupils. Pupils consider the necessary characteristics for an effective student council member and vote using a secret class ballot.  Our council meets with other school councillors from the North of Knowsley and other SLD schools from all over Greater Merseyside to learn about the views of others and experience democracy in a wider context. The Council is actively involved in recruitment of teaching staff. Examples of positive changes made are – designing and choosing equipment for our outdoor play areas, being involved in the implementation of healthier choices at lunchtimes, planning anti- bullying week activities and charity events.

Staff encourage children to know that their views count, to value each other’s views, and to talk and listen to each other about their feelings. Pupils learn to respect the right of every individual to have their opinions and voices heard. We encourage pupils to take ownership of not only their school but also of their own learning and progress whenever possible. This encourages a heightened sense of both personal and social responsibility and is demonstrated on a daily basis by our pupils. This voice can be heard through using words, signing, and written words. 

Pupils are always listened to by adults and are taught to listen carefully and with concern to each other, 

Parents’ opinions are welcomed at Bleasdale through an annual parent/carer questionnaire, parents’ evenings, Annual Reviews, Parent Support Group and through the Parent/Carer Facebook page.

Not only does this democratic voice feed through the pupil’s curriculum, we have also made it overtly clear in Topic Summer 4 2022 with a “Pupil Led Topic” Term.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their wellbeing and safety

The importance of rules and laws, whether they be those that govern our school or our country, are referred to and reinforced often, such as in assemblies and when reflecting on choices. At the start of the school year, each class share and build up routines, models with the pupil the class rules and routines, principles that every class member is able to learn in a safe and mutually supportive environment.

Pen Picture determine clear expectations for behaviour and care promote dignity.  

We have visits from authorities such as the police and fire service which will be accessed in a sensory manor.

We explore rules/experiences/symbols of particular faiths in Religious Education.

Our Code of Conduct and Team Teach training identifies the expected behaviour of all adults who work with our children. 

Other curriculum subjects, where there is a need for respect and appreciation of different rules – e.g. P.E. 

The importance of rules and laws, whether they be those that govern our school or our country, are referred to and reinforced often, such as in assemblies and when reflecting on behaviour choices. At the start of the school year, each class where able, discusses the school rules and class routines, principles that are clearly understood by all and seen to be necessary to ensure that every class member is able to learn in a safe and mutually supportive environment. As pupils may Struggle to communicate basic needs, this interaction is often explained through schedules, symbols and behaviour choice cards were pupils will indicate they may need to go outside or to a safe space area. 

Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and use of report cards promote self-regulation of behaviour (based on the 6 stages of a crisis).  

Learn to recognise simple emotion 

Limited or no joint attention.

Allows for support to interact with others including visits from authorities such as the police and fire service.

We explore rules for particular faiths in Religious Education, accepting other people and will learn to share space with familiar people.

As pupils often display high levels of anxiety e.g. transitioning. Our Code of Conduct and Team Teach training identifies the expected behaviour of all adults who work with our children and young adults. 

Other curriculum subjects, where there is a need for respect and appreciation of different rules – e.g. P.E. sensory circuits 

The importance of rules and laws, whether they be those that govern our school or our country, are referred to and reinforced often, such as in assemblies and when reflecting on behaviour choices. At the start of the school year, each class where able, discusses the school rules and class routines, principles that are clearly understood by all and seen to be necessary to ensure that every class member is able to learn in a safe and mutually supportive environment.

Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and use of report cards promote self-regulation of behaviour.  

We have visits from authorities such as the police and fire service.

We look at rules for particular faiths in Religious Education.

Our Code of Conduct identifies and Team Teach training the expected behaviour of all adults who work with our children. 

Other curriculum subjects, where there is a need for respect and appreciation of different rules – e.g. P.E. 

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary, and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary

Students will experience the application  of rules and occasionally the changing of rules under particular circumstances. Eg non uniform days.

Learning in this area is often linked to student council eg the student council help to implement rules/policies etc  that come from other pupils/ teachers/senior management. Learning to make choices is key within the Sensory Pathway. During the student council they will often have an object of reference to understand the relevance of the vote, and then make a choice with eye pointing or switches. 

Governor presence in the school eg promoting awareness of who staff governors are and highlighting any times that other governors come into school, their role, and what we can do within our school system. 

…and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence.

This can often be a contentious issue teaching in this area, and often brings out a lot of debate by pupils and teachers. It is therefore important to have clear objects of refence for it to have meaning for our young people and very clear choices. 

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary

Students who are able will consider who makes rules and who enforces them within the class, the school and the country. They may consider  if rule makers can make any rule they want.

Students will experience the application  of rules and occasionally the changing of rules under particular circumstances. Eg non uniform days.

Learning in this area is often linked to student council eg the student council help to implement rules/policies etc  that come from other pupils/ teachers/senior management.

Governor presence in the school eg promoting awareness of who staff governors are and highlighting any times that other governors come into school, their role, and what we can do within our school system. 

…and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence.

This can often be a contentious issue teaching in this area, and often brings out a lot of debate by pupils and teachers. It is therefore important to set the rules of the discussion before the learning takes place. 

An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary

Students who are able will consider who makes rules and who enforces them within the class, the school and the country. They may consider  if rule makers can make any rule they want.

Students will experience the application  of rules and occasionally the changing of rules under particular circumstances. Eg non uniform days.

Learning in this area is often linked to student council eg the student council help to implement rules/policies etc  that come from other pupils/ teachers/senior management.

Governor presence in the school eg promoting awareness of who staff governors are and highlighting any times that other governors come into school, their role, and what we can do within our school system. 

…and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence.

This can often be a contentious issue teaching in this area, and often brings out a lot of debate by pupils and teachers. It is therefore important to set the rules of the discussion before the learning takes place. 

 

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law

Alongside rules and laws, we promote freedom of choice and the right to respectfully express views and beliefs. Through the provision of a safe, supportive environment, we provide boundaries for our pupils to make choices safely dependent on their ability; for example:

Choices about what learning challenge or activity with very small increments of increased attention to activities. 

Choices about what is in their Learning Journal (EFL/Folder of work – with pupil reflections). 

Through IEP Targets/Challenges pupils are encouraged to take ownership of ways they can improve their learning and progress, giving them a sense of personal and social responsibility.

Choices around the participation in extra-curricular activities and whilst engaged in the Majors Award/JASS/After school PE and Duke of Edinburgh Award increasing functional communication

Our pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are taught how to exercise these safely, such as in our PSHE lessons leading to elements of supported choice and responsibility of leading a fulfilling life.

To be supported to express their views when out in the community. Pupils also make choices around Friday Options activities and Golden Time.

Alongside rules and laws, we promote freedom of choice and the right to respectfully express views and beliefs. Through the provision of a safe, supportive environment, we provide boundaries for our pupils to make choices safely dependent on their ability; for example:

Choices about what learning challenge or activity through increased functional communication e.g. PECS and visual schedules

Elements of supported choices about what is in their Learning Journal (EFL/Folder of work – with pupil reflections). 

Through IEP Targets/Challenges pupils are encouraged to take ownership of ways they can improve their learning and progress, giving them a sense of personal and social responsibility.

Learning to tolerate peers and adults with choices around the participation in extra-curricular activities and whilst engaged in the Majors Award/JASS/After school PE and Duke of Edinburgh Award

Our pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are taught how to exercise these safely, such as in our PSHE lessons. A key element within a structure pathway is to generalise these skills. 

To be supported to express their views when out in the community. Pupils also make choices around Friday Options activities and Golden Time.

Alongside rules and laws, we promote freedom of choice and the right to respectfully express views and beliefs. Through the provision of a safe, supportive environment, we provide boundaries for our pupils to make choices safely dependent on their ability; for example:

Choices about what learning challenge or activity

Choices about what is in their Learning Journal (EFL/Folder of work – with pupil reflections). 

Through IEP Targets/Challenges pupils are encouraged to take ownership of ways they can improve their learning and progress, giving them a sense of personal and social responsibility.

Choices around the participation in extra-curricular activities and whilst engaged in the Majors Award/JASS/After school PE and Duke of Edinburgh Award

Our pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are taught how to exercise these safely, such as in our PSHE lessons.

Pupils also make choices around Friday Options activities and Golden Time.

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour

Acceptance that other people having different faiths:

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term: where pupils will follow board maker instructions to contribute to whole school soup making or Diwali light festival – enjoying a sensory light experience in the Performing Arts room. 

Looking specifically at the pupils learning we often make reference to  the basic rights and responsibilities which includes the right to vote etc. We always teach that this applies to everyone in this country regardless of race, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation and is enshrined in the discrimination act.

We are a very inclusive school and if we notice difference we celebrate it in many different ways, be it learning new ways to communicate in class to inviting people of other faiths and believes in to our assemblies.

Acceptance that other people having different faiths:

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term: where pupils will follow board maker instructions to contribute to whole school soup making or Diwali light festival – enjoying a sensory light experience in the Performing Arts room. 

Looking specifically at the pupils learning we often make reference to  the basic rights and responsibilities which includes the right to vote etc. We always teach that this applies to everyone in this country regardless of race, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation and is enshrined in the discrimination act.

We are a very inclusive school and if we notice difference we celebrate it in many different ways, be it learning new ways to communicate in class to inviting people of other faiths and believes in to our assemblies. 

Acceptance that other people having different faiths:

On our calendar of work you will see we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term: where pupils will follow board maker instructions to contribute to whole school soup making or Diwali light festival – enjoying a sensory light experience in the Performing Arts room. 

Looking specifically at the pupils learning we often make reference to  the basic rights and responsibilities which includes the right to vote etc. We always teach that this applies to everyone in this country regardless of race, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation and is enshrined in the discrimination act.

We are a very inclusive school and if we notice difference we celebrate it in many different ways, be it learning new ways to communicate in class to inviting people of other faiths and believes in to our assemblies. 

Area

What it looks like ‘To Be’ Pathway

What it looks like ‘To Do’ Pathway

What it looks like in the ‘To Know’ Pathway

An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination

Inclusion, mutual tolerance and respect are at the heart of Bleasdale’s aims and ethos:

“Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement

We believe that each person is respected and valued equally without regard to faith, heritage, race, ability or gender

Staff aim to enhance pupils understanding and respect for different cultures, faiths and beliefs through our curriculum, examples are; 

Creative Arts – by considering cultures from around the world through music, art and dance. 

Humanities and MFL: Knowledge & Understanding of the World – through organising Themed Weeks where we celebrate and enjoy the differences between other countries and cultures. 

Literacy and ICT – where there are opportunities to explore cultures and traditions using a wide range of fiction, non-fiction texts and the internet. As part of E-Safety and the teacher cascading PREVENT training down to pupils.

PSHE, Health and Wellbeing – where Circle Time and The Thrive Approach are both important tools for promoting mutual tolerance and respect. 

Scientific Learning– in which practical activities require students to engage in teamwork and show mutual respect for each other. 

We also encourage involvement in; 

Charity Events where pupils are made aware of the needs of people both in our own and other countries, supporting them through national fund raising events such as Children in Need, Comic Relief and Sports Relief. 

Alan Turing Scheme of work in which staff visit and are visited by schools across Europe which promotes mutual respect for one another’s heritage. 

Day to day, pupils are aware of/experience  the concept of being fair and EVERYONE having a share or a turn and that any instance of discrimination is /will be  treated seriously (in line with our policies and expectations).

Inclusion, mutual tolerance and respect are at the heart of Bleasdale’s aims and ethos:

“Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement

We believe that each person is respected and valued equally without regard to faith, heritage, race, ability or gender

Staff aim to enhance pupils understanding and respect for different cultures, faiths and beliefs through our curriculum, examples are; 

Creative Arts – by considering cultures from around the world through music, art and dance. 

Humanities and MFL: Knowledge & Understanding of the World – through organising Themed Weeks where we celebrate and enjoy the differences between other countries and cultures. 

Literacy and ICT – where there are opportunities to explore cultures and traditions using a wide range of fiction, non-fiction texts and the internet. As part of E-Safety and the teacher cascading PREVENT training down to pupils.

PSHE, Health and Wellbeing – where Circle Time and The Thrive Approach are both important tools for promoting mutual tolerance and respect. 

Scientific Learning– in which practical activities require students to engage in teamwork and show mutual respect for each other. 

We also encourage involvement in; 

Charity Events where pupils are made aware of the needs of people both in our own and other countries, supporting them through national fund raising events such as Children in Need, Comic Relief and Sports Relief. 

The Alan Turing Scheme of work in which staff visit and are visited by schools across Europe which promotes mutual respect for one another’s heritage. 

Day to day, pupils are aware of/experience  the concept of being fair and EVERYONE having a share or a turn and that any instance of discrimination is /will be  treated seriously (in line with our policies and expectations).

Inclusion, mutual tolerance and respect are at the heart of Bleasdale’s aims and ethos:

“Learn about our world, care for others and celebrate achievement

We believe that each person is respected and valued equally without regard to faith, heritage, race, ability or gender

Staff aim to enhance pupils understanding and respect for different cultures, faiths and beliefs through our curriculum, examples are; 

Creative Arts – by considering cultures from around the world through music, art and dance. 

Humanities and MFL: Knowledge & Understanding of the World – through organising Themed Weeks where we celebrate and enjoy the differences between other countries and cultures. 

Literacy and ICT – where there are opportunities to explore cultures and traditions using a wide range of fiction, non-fiction texts and the internet. As part of E-Safety and the teacher cascading PREVENT training down to pupils. 

PSHE, Health and Wellbeing – where Circle Time and The Thrive Approach are both important tools for promoting mutual tolerance and respect. 

Scientific Learning– in which practical activities require students to engage in teamwork and show mutual respect for each other. 

We also encourage involvement in; 

Charity Events where pupils are made aware of the needs of people both in our own and other countries, supporting them through national fund raising events such as Children in Need, Comic Relief and Sports Relief. 

The  Alan Turing Scheme of work in which staff visit and are visited by schools across Europe which promotes mutual respect for one another’s heritage. 

Day to day, pupils are aware of/experience  the concept of being fair and EVERYONE having a share or a turn and that any instance of discrimination is /will be  treated seriously (in line with our policies and expectations).

Other examples include:  

Being part of Britain

As a school, we value and celebrate the diverse heritages of everybody in the school. Alongside this, we value and celebrate being part of Britain. In general terms, this means that we celebrate traditions and customs in the course of the year; for example, Harvest Festival during the autumn term and trips to the pantomime in at Christmas. We also value and celebrate national events, with a remembrance day service each year, our poppy garden and silver birch to represent the fields visited by two of our pupils in the Somme. 

Children learn about being part of Britain from different perspectives and relative to age and ability to grasp concepts. Two specific examples of when we teach about being part of Britain are:

Geographically: Water and seaside holiday topics ensure that children have a better understanding of what Britain is, learning more about:

  • its coasts, rivers and mountains
  • where Britain is in relation to the rest of Europe and other countries in the world
  • Historically: Key moments in British history are studied in the topics such as Vikings, the gunpowder plot and several other topics

Democracy

Children, parents and staff have many opportunities for their voices to be heard at Bleasdale school. Democracy is central to how we operate and reflected in our equal opportunities policy.

A clear example is the School Council. Pupils are elected not only to express their own views on matters about the school but also to represent the needs of others who do not have a voice e.g. PMLD pupils. Our council meets with other school councillors from other SLD schools from all over Lancashire to learn about the views of others and experience democracy in a wider context. 

Pupils are always listened to by adults and are taught to listen carefully and with concern to each other, respecting the right of every individual to have their opinions and voices heard. We encourage pupils to take ownership of not only their school but also of their own learning and progress whenever possible. This encourages a heightened sense of both personal and social responsibility and is demonstrated on a daily basis by our pupils.

Parents’ opinions are welcomed at Bleasdale School through an annual parent/carer questionnaire, home-school link books, parents evenings, Annual Reviews, Parent Support Group. 

Rules and Laws

The importance of rules and laws, whether they be those that govern our school or our country, are referred to and reinforced often, such as in assemblies and when reflecting on behaviour choices. At the start of the school year, each class where able, discusses the school rules and class routines, principles that are clearly understood by all and seen to be necessary to ensure that every class member is able to learn in a safe and mutually supportive environment.

  • Behaviour Support Plans determine clear expectations for behaviour and promote self-regulation of behaviour.  
  • We have visits from authorities such as the police and fire service.
  • We look at rules for particular faiths in ‘My World’ sessions.
  • Our Code of Conduct identifies the expected behaviour of all adults who work with our children.  

 

Individual Liberty

Alongside rules and laws, we promote freedom of choice and the right to respectfully express views and beliefs. Through the provision of a safe, supportive environment, we provide boundaries for our pupils to make choices safely dependent on their ability; for example:

  • Choices about what learning challenge or activity
  • Choices about what is in their Learning Journal
  • Choices around the participation in extra-curricular activities.

Our pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are taught how to exercise these safely, such as in our PSHE lessons.

 

Mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

The school Mission Statement to “Learn together, Achieve Together” fosters mutual respect and recognition of others. 

Some examples we have that serve to enhance pupils’ understanding and respect for different faiths and beliefs are:

Through ‘Our World’, PSHE and other lessons where we develop awareness and appreciation of other cultures – in Communication through fiction and in Expressive arts and music by considering cultures from other parts of the world.

Celebrating cultural differences through assemblies, themed weeks, noticeboards and displays.

Whilst instances contrary to our values are relatively rare, no school can guarantee that there will never be instances which are contrary to our values. Each is treated seriously in line with our policies and expectations.

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